This passenger arriving in New York in 1927 was met with a rather cold reception. “Returning aboard the France, which arrived in the midst of the recent cold wave with decks covered with ice,” The New York Times reported at the time, she bundled up in a few extra layers to survey the frozen isle of Manhattan. The SS Île de France was a French ocean liner, which made its maiden voyage on June 22, 1927. The ship’s art deco decor made it popular with hip, affluent travelers crossing between the continents. It was even immortalized in song by Ginger Rogers, who, in the film “Swing Time,” sang to Fred Astaire that he was “just as hard to land as the Île de France.” (Ella Fitzgerald’s version of the song, “A Fine Romance,” left out the line about the ship.) In 1939, the ocean liner was the last civilian ship to leave France before the start of World War II, shuttling 1,777 passengers, many of them American tourists, out of Le Havre just hours before the country declared war on Germany. After a stint as a wartime prison ship, in 1945 the Île de France returned to civilian duty, and to the cultural scene: The first part of the 1949 Broadway musical “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” takes place on its decks. Visit @nytarchives for more vintage photos. Photo by The New York Times. #tbt

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This passenger arriving in New York in 1927 was met with a rather cold reception. “Returning aboard the France, which arrived in the midst of the recent cold wave with decks covered with ice,” The New York Times reported at the time, she bundled up in a few extra layers to survey the frozen isle of Manhattan. The SS Île de France was a French ocean liner, which made its maiden voyage on June 22, 1927. The ship’s art deco decor made it popular with hip, affluent travelers crossing between the continents. It was even immortalized in song by Ginger Rogers, who, in the film “Swing Time,” sang to Fred Astaire that he was “just as hard to land as the Île de France.” (Ella Fitzgerald’s version of the song, “A Fine Romance,” left out the line about the ship.) In 1939, the ocean liner was the last civilian ship to leave France before the start of World War II, shuttling 1,777 passengers, many of them American tourists, out of Le Havre just hours before the country declared war on Germany. After a stint as a wartime prison ship, in 1945 the Île de France returned to civilian duty, and to the cultural scene: The first part of the 1949 Broadway musical “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” takes place on its decks. Visit @nytarchives for more vintage photos. Photo by The New York Times. #tbt

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